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Apakah Akan Seperti Tahun 1970an Kembali?

“I think investors have to keep in mind that this has been the largest takedown in any single quarter in the history of the supposedly free-trading gold market, and it’s going to go back violently the other way. We are only going to see the currency wars intensify in the future. And because the global economy is in shambles and countries are competing to debase their currencies in order to grab a share of what is continuing to become a shrinking economic pie, this means more and more money creation. This will lead to stagflation on steroids, and the stagflation of the 1970s created a 25-fold move in gold and a 38-fold move in silver. The reality is that investors should expect at least those kinds of moves for gold and silver this time around if not more.”

– John Embry

Sentimen bearish emas jangka menengah nampaknya masih berlangsung dan belum menunjukkan tanda akan berakhir. Dimulai sejak exodus emas yang terus-menerus pada musim winter dan kemudian berkembang lebih dramatis di musim spring.

Dalam beberapa bulan ini, emas telah mengalami penurunan yang menakutkan sehingga membuat para ‘pendukung setia’nya pun enggan melakukan transaksi.  Harga emas jatuh hingga ke level terendahnya hampir selama 3 tahun.

Bukan seperti emas – logam mulia yang setiap tahun selalu naik dalam dekade terakhir ini. Kejatuhan emas tersebut sebagian memang disebabkan oleh kuatnya performansi di bursa saham.

Ya memang tidak begitu banyak ketakutan para investor.  Atau dengan kata lain, setidaknya mereka tidak ketakutan terhadap segala sesuatu. Di saat absennya volatilitas, para investor pun tidak banyak terdorong untuk ke aset safe haven seperti emas.

Selain itu, komoditas yang dikenal sebagai inflation hedge ini diragukan nilainya ketika inflasi tidak ada. Dan bagi para investors yang masih berharap bahwa stimulus agresif the Fed AS bakal mendorong inflasi, sudah mulai menipis kesabarannya.

Jadi apakah sentimen bullish emas sudah berakhir, atau penurunan menakutkan emas tersebut hanya merupakan koreksi jangka menengah yang nanti akan segera diikuti dengan kelanjutan sentimen bullish jangka panjangnya?

Ini adalah pertanyaan yang jawabannya ada dalam 2 artikel berikut, yang masuk dalam kategori WAJIB DIBACA, khususnya bagi yang kehilangan kesabaran dan kepercayaan terhadap emas.

Yang pertama dari Jeff Clark, Senior Precious Metals Analyst pada Casey Research, yang mendalami gerak turun emas besar-besaran baru-baru ini dalam artikelnya yang berjudul Telegraphing the Turnaround in Gold:

“As of last Friday, gold has now fallen as much 35.4% (based on London PM fix prices) over 96 weeks. But if you’re like us, you still recognize that the core reasons for investing in gold haven’t changed. People who sold their gold recently made a shortsighted decision. Before too long precious metals will rebound—and probably in a big way.

But when? Does history have any clues about how long we’ll have to wait for that rebound?

Perhaps the most constructive way to forecast a turnaround in gold is to look at how its price behaved in prior big corrections.

Here’s an updated view of gold’s three largest corrections since 2001, along with the time it took the price to return to the old high and stay above that level.

It has taken a significant amount time for gold to return to old highs after each big selloff this cycle. And the bigger the correction, the longer it has taken—with each correction lasting longer than the last.

However, I think our current correction more closely resembles what occurred in 1974-1976 than any of the dips so far this cycle. Here’s an updated overlay of the gold price then and now.

As you can see, during the big correction of the 1970s, gold declined 47% and took 187 weeks to recapture old highs. This fits in with the pattern discussed above: the bigger the correction, the lengthier the recovery. Another interesting pattern: the time to reach new highs always equals or exceeds the duration of the decline.

While the current correction hasn’t been as deep as that of the mid-’70s, the decline is already longer, and it’s the most prolonged of the current cycle. It is thus reasonable to expect gold to take two years or more to regain the $1,900 level and continue beyond. Barring a black swan event, gold will likely log its first annual loss since 2000 this year. These are not predictions, just possibilities, and a reminder that if gold is slow to recover, it’s simply adhering to past patterns.

However, it’s not all bad news, as the chart shows: gold nearly doubled in the two years from its ’76 low to its ’78 return to former highs. The message here is obvious: add to your inventory at depressed levels. And don’t worry about missing the bottom; investors who waited to buy until gold had retraced 30% of its decline still netted about a 70% gain once it returned to prior highs.

The same patterns hold true with stocks. You can see the high-to-low-to-prior-high time frame was longer, but the gains were bigger once the dust settled.

Investors who bucked the conventional wisdom of the day and bought a basket of gold and silver producers in the autumn of 1976—after they had dropped by almost 70%—more than tripled their investment. We’re now approaching the degree of selloff that was seen then, setting up a similar opportunity to profit.

Don’t let the long recovery times shown in the charts deter you. Stay focused on the pattern; once the declines reversed, the general trend was up. Contrarians and forward-thinking investors need to prepare for that reality, rather than take umbrage with how long it might take to beat old highs. By the time mainstream analysts—who know little about gold in the first place—declare it has entered a “new” bull market, the lows will be long behind us, along with the best buying opportunities.

Selloffs Can Be Profitable Setups

Once gold bottomed at $103.50 on August 25, 1976, the trend reversed and the metal rose a whopping 721% to peak at $850 on January 21, 1980.

Silver’s climb was even more dramatic. From its 1976 low of $4.08, it soared 1,101%. This is the 10-bagger grail of investing, where investors had the chance to add a zero to their initial investments.

But remember: the process was multiyear and began after a dismal two-year decline that was punctuated with sharp selloffs, similar to gold’s behavior since its 2011 high. While that’s a stupendous return within a short time frame, the biggest gains were seen in the final five months. The patience of some investors would certainly have been tested in those first three years.

Here’s a look at the gains for the metals from their respective lows.

Both gold and silver logged double-digit returns every year after the bottom (except silver the first year). Once the momentum had shifted, buying and holding while the fundamental forces played out led to huge profits. No “trading” was necessary; just buy after a big correction and hold on for the ride.

No need to attempt to time the bottom, either; those who bought a year after the lows still reaped gains of 490% for gold and 996% for silver. The largest chunk of profits came in the second year and beyond.

Also of note is that the second leg up in precious metals was bigger than the first. There’s no reason to think we won’t experience the same thing this time around.

The messages from history are self-evident:

  • Be patient. Odds favor gold emerging from a period of price consolidation and volatility. This process will take time.
  • Be prepared. Big gains follow big selloffs. We can’t be certain if the final bottom is in yet, but buying at these levels will ultimately net big profits if you’re buying the most solid of the major producers and potentially life-changing gains if you’re buying the best juniors.”

Artikel kedua juga akan bernilai untuk Anda yang dibuat oleh Peter Schiff dari Euro Pacific Capital, yang menjelaskan tentang gold bug bashing:

The Golden Cycle

The New York Times had the definitive take on the vicious sell off in gold. To summarize one of their articles:

Two years ago gold bugs ran wild as the price of gold rose nearly six times. But since cresting two years ago it has steadily declined, almost by half, putting the gold bugs in flight.  The most recent advisory from a leading Wall Street firm suggests that the price will continue to drift downward, and may ultimately settle 40% below current levels.

The rout says a lot about consumer confidence in the worldwide recovery. The sharply reduced rates of inflation combined with resurgence of other, more economically productive investments, such as stocks, real estate, and bank savings have combined to eliminate gold’s allure.

Although the American economy has reduced its rapid rate of recovery, it is still on a firm expansionary course. The fear that dominated two years ago has largely vanished, replaced by a recovery that has turned the gold speculators’ dreams into a nightmare.

This analysis provides a good representation of the current conventional wisdom. The only twist here is that the article from which this summary is derived appeared in the August 29, 1976 edition of The New York Times. At that time gold was preparing to embark on an historic rally that would push it up more than 700% a little over three years later. Is it possible that the history is about to repeat itself?

At the time The Times article was written gold had fallen to $103 per ounce, a decline of nearly 50% from the roughly $200 it had sold for in the closing days of 1974. The $200 price had capped a furious three-year rally that began in August of 1971 when President Nixon “temporarily” closed the gold window and allowed gold to float freely. Prior to that decision gold had been fixed at $35 per ounce for nearly two generations. That initial three year 450% rally had validated the forecasts of the “gold bugs” who had predicted a rapid rise in gold prices should the dollar’s link to gold be severed. The accuracy of these formerly marginalized analysts proved to be a bitter pill for the mainstream voices in Washington and Wall Street who, for reasons of power, politics and profit, were anxious to confine the “barbarous relic” to the dustbin of history. Incredulous as it may seem now, with gold still priced at $35 per ounce, official forecasts of both the Secretary of the Treasury and the Chairman of the Federal Reserve were that demonetizing gold would undermine its value, and that its price would actually fall as a result.

Of course government experts could not have been more wrong. Once uncoupled from the dollar, gold’s initial ascent in the early 1970′s was fueled by the highest inflation in generations and the deteriorating health of the U.S. economy that had been ravaged by the “guns and butter” policies of the 1960′s. But the American economy stabilized during the mid-years of the 1970′s and both inflation and unemployment fell. When gold reversed course in 1975 the voices of traditional power elite could not contain their glee. When the gold price approached $100 per ounce, a nearly 50% decline, the obituaries came fast and furious. Everyone assumed that the gold mania would never return.

Although the writer of The Times piece did not yet know it, the bottom for gold had been established four days before his article was published. Few realized at the time that the real economic pain of the 1970′s had (to paraphrase The Carpenters 1970′s hit) “Only Just Begun”. When inflation and recession came back with a vengeance in the late 1970′s, gold took off (to quote another 1970′s gem), like a skyrocket in flight. By January 1980, gold topped out at $850 an ounce. The second leg of the rally proved to be bigger than the first.

The parallel between the 1970s and the current period are even more striking when you look closely at the numbers. For example, from 1971 to 1974 gold prices rose by 458% from $35 to $195.25, which was then followed by a two-year correction of nearly 50%. This reduced total gains to just under 200%. The current bull market that began back in 2000 took a bit longer to evolve, but the percentage gains are very similar. (We should allow for a more compressed time frame in the 1970s because of the sudden untethering of gold after decades of restraint.) From its 1999 low to its 2011 peak, gold rose by about 650% from $253 to $1895 per ounce, followed by a two year correction of approximately 37%, down to around $1190 per ounce. The pullback has reduced the total rally to about 370%. The mainstream is saying now, as they did then, that the pullback has invalidated fears that rising U. S. budget deficits, overly accommodative monetary policy, and a weakening economy will combine to bring down the dollar and ignite inflation. But 1976 was not the end of the game. In all likelihood, 2013 will not be either.

The biggest difference between then and now is that until 1975 ordinary Americans were barred by law from buying and owning gold. About the only route available to participate in the earlier stage of the precious metal rally was by hording silver dimes, quarters and half dollars minted prior to 1965. My father indulged in this process himself by sifting through his change, the cash registers of any merchant who would allow him (exchanging new non-silver coins and bills for silver), and by sifting out silver coins from rolls he bought from banks. It was a time-consuming process, and most of his friends and family members thought he was crazy. After all, he had $10,000 worth of pocket change earning no interest. But the $10,000 face value worth of those coins he collected had a melt value of over $350,000 when silver hit its peak.

By the mid 1970′s none of the problems that initially led to the recession in the early years of the decade had been solved. Contrary to the claims of the “experts” things got much worse in the years ahead. It took the much deeper recession of the late 1970′s and early 1980′s, which at the time was the worst economic down-turn since the great Depression, to finally purge the economy of all the excesses. The lower marginal tax rates and cuts in regulation implemented by President Reagan and tight money under Volcker helped get the economy back on track and create investment opportunities that drew money away from gold. As a result gold fell hard during the early 1980′s. But even after the declines, gold maintained levels for the next 20 years that were three to four times as high as the 1976 lows.

Although the economy improved in the 1980′s, the cure was not complete. Government spending, budget and trade deficits continued to take a heavy toll. The U.S. was transformed from the world’s largest creditor to its largest debtor. When the time came to face the music in 2001, the Fed kept the party going by opening the monetary spigots. Then when decades of monetary excess finally came to a head in 2008, the Fed opened up its monetary spigots even wider, flooding the economy with even more cheap money.

Unfortunately just like 1976, a true economic recovery is not just around the corner. More likely we are in the eye of an economic storm that will blow much harder than the stagflation winds of the Jimmy Carter years. And once again the establishment is using the decline in the price of gold to validate its misguided policies and discredit its critics. But none of the problems that led me and other modern day gold bugs to buy gold ten years ago have been solved. In fact, monetary and fiscal policies have actually made them much worse. The sad truth is that as bad as things were back in 1976, they are much worse now. Whether as a nation we will be able to rise to the occasion, and actually finish the job that Ronald Reagan and Paul Volcker started remains to be seen. But I am confident that the price of gold will rise much higher, and that its final ascent will be that much more spectacular the longer we continue on our current policy path. Don’t believe the mainstream. Just as before, they will likely be wrong again.

Catatan pribadi: Emas kemungkinan akan naik dalam beberapa bulan mendatang, namun perlu meningkat terlebih dahulu di sepanjang pekan ini.

Memang masih jauh untuk menuju ke level $1400, namun dengan tembusnya ke atas level $1300 saat ini maka ada peluang untuk menuju areal resistance $1350.

Seperti biasa di akhir tulisan agar senantiasa ceria, berikut adalah sebuah gambar lucu untuk Anda:

Terima kasih sudah membaca dan semoga beruntung hari ini!

Dibuat Tanggal 23 Juli 2013

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